Week 2 reflection

After reading several blogs about engagement I can see that we have all had some no so successful lessons. I really enjoyed reading Karen’s blog and her sharing with us how she turned her lesson around and made it engaging for the students. WTG Karen! In my blog I shared two articles with 10 steps to engagement each. Ginger shares in her blog an article by Angela Maiers, the “26 Keys to Student Engagement” organized A through Z. Here is the website – BOOKMARK it. http://www.angelamaiers.com/2008/04/engagement-alph.html

It was nice to read that I am not the only one that wanted to highlight and write down all the hooks that Burgess takes about in this book.  I have not enjoyed a graduate level required reading before. I am ordering the hardback of this book for my personal library. Thank you Dr. Lee for picking out such a wonderful book. Looking forward to finishing the book.

I am presenting at our district wide in-service this coming week and I am going to share this book and of course the 26 keys to student engagement with my co-workers across the slope.

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Engagement

To keep my lessons engaging I must first “plan and prepare” for my presentation of the lesson. Sadly I have seen what can happen in my classroom when I try to wig it. But I have seen wonderful things happen in my classroom when the lessons are over the top. Burgess says, “you have to bring energy to your lesson through enthusiasm and showmanship.” (2012) If I am full of energy about the lesson then more than likely my students will have high energy about the lesson.

“The educators at Cochrane Collegiate Academy, in Charlotte, North Carolina, have developed an instructional model called Interactive Learning (IL). It is a collection of their ten best practices, which they call their non-negotiables, and teachers must implement them in every lesson, every day.” (Nobori, 2011) The ten best practices are:

  • Essential Question
  • Activating strategy
  • Relevant Vocabulary
  • Limited Lecture
  • Graphic Organizer
  • Student Movement
  • Higher Order Thinking Questions
  • Summarize
  • Rigorous
  • Student Centered

I do not do all ten of these practices with each lesson but I do do most of them. I let my students experience their learning, all lessons are hands-on, I don’t mind the student getting messy with their learning, I bring the community/culture into every lesson, and most importantly my students are engaged and learning. Burgess talks about hooks and how to get students drawn into our lessons. I start with a hook and I have hooks for interrupts and dead time. As a teacher in an alternative school we often have times when I have to leave the room to deal with a situation. I have to have hooks to bring my students back into the lesson.

Frondeville (2009) lists ten ways of engagement in his article and summarizes how to use for primary, middle and high school grades. They are:

  • Start Class with a Mind Warm-Up
  • Use Movement to Get Kids Focused
  • Teach Students How to Collaborate Before Expecting Success
  • Use Quickwrites When You Want Quiet Time and Student Reflection
  • Run a Tight Ship When Giving Instructions
  • Use a Fairness Cup to Keep Students Thinking
  • Use Signaling to Allow Everyone to Answer Your Question
  • Use Minimal-Supervision Tasks to Squeeze Dead Time out of Regular Routines
  • Mix up Your Teaching Styles
  • Create Teamwork Tactics That Emphasize Accountability

I believe that we need to experience a bad lesson to know how to make them engaging all the time. We need to be prepared for when we think a lesson is going to be a hit and it is not. We need to be flexible and have activities and lessons in our back pocket for days when things just don’t seem to going right.

Work cited

Burgess, D. (2012). Teach like a pirate. San Diego, CA: Dave Burgess Consulting, Inc.

Frondeville, T. (2009) How to Keep Kids Engaged in Class. Edutopia.  http://www.edutopia.org/classroom-student-participation-tips. Retrieved on 20 September 2013

Nobori, Mariko. (2011) Ten Tips for Engaging Underperforming Students. Edutopia. http://www.edutopia.org/stw-school-turnaround-student-engagement-tips. Retrieved on 20 September 2013

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~Butcher up a caribou (tuttu)~

Week 1 response

Some of my classmates like theatric, just like Dave Burgess, some like using technology, which is what all of our students are passionate about, and some like using different learning styles. I am a mixture of all of them. Because I teach so many different subjects I am more theatric in health and Alaska studies classes. I use technology in all classes but not very passionate about it. I love using different learning styles. I am a hands-on person and love to move around the room. Some days can be BORING and others can be off the wall FUN. As Andrea Stineff stated in her blog “If students are the reason I became a teacher, and the relationship with the students is the key to being a good teacher as stated by Burgess, Kozol, and Urban. Then it goes to say that to maintain my passion for teaching in the face of so much change I must keep my focus on the reason I am there: the students.” I have a personal connection with each of my students and that is what makes them fight to take my class, even is some of my lessons are boring.

Jenn states “passion comes from what you love to do.” I love to teach and educate people. I also love to learn new things. I love to help and be involved with my community. My connection is my community as helped me as a teacher as well.

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~Arctic Ocean Ice~ Beautiful

Passion

How do we maintain our passion for teaching in the face of so much change?

I have only been in teaching for a short of time so my passion for teaching is fresh and new. Don’t get me wrong there have been days when I wanted to scream and run for the classroom or building but my students are what keep me going.

 

I have always wanted to be a teacher. When in elementary school my friends and I use to play school. We all took turns being the teacher, principal and students. We loved every minute of it, we all wanted to be Mrs. Titus. Mrs. Titus became my teacher when I was in first grade and stayed my teacher until I moved into 6th grade. We learned our multiplication table by singing and listening to rap song, rapping multiplication. She was a teacher that was a live and was so happy to see us every day. We took adventures in her classroom all around the world, we had teddy bear day, we had classroom competitions, and we did plays for the community and much more. I want to be just like her.

Throughout my junior high and high school years I had a number of different teachers, some great and some not so great. It was my sophomore year in MEHS that I wanted to become a high school science teacher. I had two of the greatest science teachers in the world. I can recall almost all the labs we did in my biology and marine biology class. I was sold. Their passion for teaching us science was over the top. At times I thought they were crazy and I wanted to be just like them.

 

Dave Burgess writes, “Our students need leaders who are willing to venture forward without a clear map to explore new frontiers. We need mavericks and renegades who are willing to use unorthodox tactics to spark and kindle the flame of creativity and imagination in the minds of the young. We need entrepreneurial innovators who are capable of captaining the educational ship through waters that are rough and constantly changing.” (104) This quote right here reminds me of those teachers that I looked up too. This is the type of teach I work to become.

 

While obtaining my teacher certificate, in one of my classes we had to write our personal mission statement, in mine I wrote about creating a safe environment and sharing my passion for learning with my students. Sherah B. Carr, Ph.D. writes, “It is my belief that before a person should enter the teaching profession they must first have a love of learning and be willing to share this passion with students.  They need to truly enjoy working with a particular age group of children.  They must possess a core set of beliefs that all children deserve respect and a chance to have a better life through the gift of learning.  They must furthermore understand that is the responsibility of the teacher to be a child advocate.   Teachers must have an understanding of the need to provide a learning environment where children feel safe, respected and challenged. “ (http://www.teachingwithpurpose.com) Today I feel like I am doing all of this and more for my students, with room to grow though. We all have are struggles, don’t get me wrong. I am not wonder woman just a teacher that is passionate about her career.

 

My passion is kept alive because of my passionate teachers throughout school, my passion for learning, the joy I get from being challenged everyday to become better, the joy I receive from my students and much more. Parker J. Palmers says it like this, “Teaching holds a mirror to the soul. If I am willing to look in that mirror, and not run from what I see, I have a chance to gain self-knowledge—and knowing myself is as crucial to good teaching as knowing my students and my subject. When I do not know myself, I cannot know who my students are. I will see them through a glass darkly, in the shadows of my unexamined life—and when I cannot see them clearly I cannot teach them well. When I do not know myself, I cannot know my subject—not at the deepest levels of embodied, personal meaning. I will know it only abstractly, from a distance, a congeries of concepts as far removed from the world as I am from personal truth.” (Heart of a teacher)

 

Change is happening everyday. One day I am told I have to follow this protocol or teach this subject or deal with this situation and the next day it is totally different. I say, “Teach each day as if it were your last, make each day count, and remember why you became a teacher in the first place.”

 

 

Burgess, D. (2012). Teach like a pirate. San Diego, CA: Dave Burgess Consulting, Inc.

 

Carr, Sherah B. Ph.D. Teaching with passion. www.teachingwithpurpose.com/passion.html Revised 03/29/2011

 

Palmer, Parker J. Heart of a teacher. Change Magazine, Vol. 29, Issue #6, pp. 14-21, Nov/Dec 1997. Reprinted with Permission of the Helen Dwight Reid Educational Foundation. Published by Heldref Publications, 1319 18th St. N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036-1802, 1-800-365-9753, Copyright 1997. http://www.couragerenewal.org/parker/writings/heart-of-a-teacher

 

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~Passion for skin sewing ~

This young lady is making rabbit mittens for herself. First time sewer!

week 13

Problem:

You are making fancy mukluk trimming for your new mukluks. The trim is 15 inches long by 3 inches wide. The pattern of the trim is a 3 inch square with a 1×3 inch rectangle on each side. The square has cross in the center of it. The vertical part of the cross is made up of 3- 1 inch squares and the top is a 0.5 by 1 inch rectangle and the bottom is a 1.5 by 1 inch rectangle. The 1×3 inch rectangles are mirror images of each other. They consist of 2 equal right triangles, opposite each other, with height of 1.5 inches and a parallelogram, in the center, with the height of 1.5 inches.
Construct your pattern on a piece of paper.  Please label each piece. If you fold your diagram in half, width wise, you will have a line of symmetry. When your teacher has signed off on your diagram please answer the following questions.
How many times with this pattern repeat itself?
How many pieces are needed for one pattern?
How many:
    squares,
    0.5 by 1 rectangles,
    1.5 by 1 rectangles,
    triangles and
    parallelograms
are needed to complete this mukluk trim?

Student work

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The pattern is a total of 5 inches long (1+3+1=5). The total length of the trim 15 inches.

15/5 = 3. The pattern will repeat itself three times.

There is a total of 3 squares, 6 rectangles, 4 right triangles and 2 parallelograms. The total number of pieces need for one pattern is 15 pieces.

 How many:

         squares,                                         3 x3 = 9

         0.5 by 1 rectangles,                      3×3 = 9

         1.5 by 1 rectangles,                      3 x 3 = 9

         triangles and                                   4 x 3 = 12

         parallelograms                               2 x 3 = 6

are needed to complete this mukluk trim?

    Total you would need nine squares, eighteen rectangles (nine of each size), twelve right triangles and six parallelogram. When you choose your colors for the square, cross, triangles and parallelograms the numbers of each figure with change due to the color needed but the overall total will be the same.

Artifacts

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My students loved the sewing part but did not like having to do MATH during sewing class. We laughed because the lesson came in after we had already started sewing. My girls liked looking at clothing from different families and looking the similarities and differences in style. We made a field trip to the fur shop and priced out some materials and we looked at the photos hanging on the wall of different clothing and designs.

I will do this again but I will start my sewing class with the unit. I want to add more to unit or break it into two units. Our school district is using UbD and this is a unit I will share at one of our meeting. This is a rough unit and needs work.

Week 12: Unit: Geometry in Sewing

Essential Question: How will I demonstrate impact on student learning as a result of my differentiated lesson?

Unit plan: Geometry in sewing

Subject: Sewing, High school mathematics

Introduction: Inhabiting the Arctic Circle for 4000 years, craftswomen of the Inupiat  culture have developed specialized clothing to allow them to survive the glacial winters. While modern textiles are now available, many of the traditional clothes are still used, which stands as a testament to their value and to the expertise of the Inupiat ancestors who created them.

Standards:

G‐MG.1. Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects (e.g., modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder).*

G‐MG.3. Apply geometric methods to solve design problems (e.g., designing an object or structure to satisfy physical constraints or minimize cost; working with typographic grid systems based on ratios).*

N‐Q.1. Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi‐step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

N‐Q.3.  Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.

Technology Standard
A: A student should be able to operate technology-based tools.
C: A student should be able to use technology to explore ideas, solve problems, and derive meaning.

 

Unit Essential Question: How can we use geometry in our skin sewing?

Unit Enduring Understanding:

  • Geometric shapes
  • Measurements – (prior knowledge)
  • Ratio and proportion – (prior knowledge)
  • Visualization and spatial reasoning
  • Representation and construction of three-dimensional objects

Unit objectives:

  • Students will be able to use visualization and spatial-reasoning skills
  • Students will be able to create patterns or blueprints for three- dimensional objects
  • Students will be able to practice measurement, ratio, and proportion
  • Students will be able to cut out and sew together their projects

Assessments:

  • Pre-assignment on geometry
  • Worksheets
  • Final project

Lesson plans

Day 1.

  • Review Geometric shapes and formulas on the smart board.
  • Pre-assignment – class assignment- place based

Problem: You are making fancy mukluk trimming for your new mukluks. The trim is 15 inches long by 3 inches wide. The pattern of the trim is a 3 inch square with a 1×3 inch rectangle on each side. The square has cross in the center of it. The vertical part of the cross is made up of 3- 1 inch squares and the top is a 0.5 by 1 inch rectangle and the bottom is a 1.5 by 1 inch rectangle. The 1×3 inch rectangles are mirror images of each other. They consist of 2 equal right triangles, opposite each other, with height of 1.5 inches and a parallelogram, in the center, with the height of 1.5 inches.

Construct your pattern on a piece of paper.  Please label each piece. If you fold your diagram in half, width wise, you will have a line of symmetry. When your teacher has signed off on your diagram please answer the following questions.

How many times with this pattern repeat itself?

How many pieces are needed for one pattern?

How many:

squares,

0.5 by 1 rectangles,

1.5 by 1 rectangles,

triangles and

parallelograms

are needed to complete this mukluk trim?

 

Day 2.

  • Provide an overview of the project and review project materials.
  • Solicit a few examples of geometry in clothing students are wearing that day.
  • Explain that students will create a sewing pattern during the project. Show a sample pattern. Ask students what they notice about it. Discuss how a pattern is similar to a house blueprint.
  • Facilitate Before You Go: Figure Figures to help students understand basic body proportion.

Homework

Have students complete Activity 1: Fashion Geometry and prepare pictures or sketches of five examples to share in class.

Day 3.

  • Review the examples students found for Activity 1: Fashion Geometry. Add more of your own to help students see the range.
    • Invite students to suggest why particular geometric patterns, shapes, cuts, or styles were used. Talk about function, features, and style.
    • Preview Activity 2: Clothes Inspection. Assign the first step—finding an article of clothing—for homework.

Homework

Have students find an article of clothing to bring to class.

Day 4.

  • Ask students to examine the article of clothing closely.
  • Distribute tape measures. Explain the Clothes Inspection Worksheet. Indicate whether students should use metric or standard measurements. 
Note: The more complex the clothing, the more challenging this will be! Support students by explaining that they should visualize the main pieces. You may even give them permission to disregard linings and other interior features (for example, for a coat or jacket).
  • Some pieces might include curves or tricky shapes. Ask the class for suggestions on how to get a measurement or fairly accurate estimate of an odd shape. Work on one example together.
  • Have students sketch the shapes of the pieces they think were used to construct their article of clothing, and measure or calculate dimensions. Students might use different approaches. Some may sketch first and then find measurements. Others might want measurements to help them draw the piece. Either approach is fine.
  • Leave 10 minutes for discussion (challenges, observations). Students may only have sketches and measurements for three or four pattern pieces; this is fine. If you think students need more measurement practice, have them finish up for homework. Otherwise, end the activity as is.

Day 5.

  • Review Activity 3: You Be the Designer. Note that this stage of the project will take several class periods and homework assignments.
  • Explain the idea of “ease”—adding 1⁄2 to 1 inch to certain measurements for a looser fit (for example, under the arms).
  • Have students start sketching patterns
  • Sign off on each student’s pattern sketches and measurements. Provide the poster board to students who are ready to move on to drawing. They should not cut pieces yet.
  • Remind students of their three tasks: drawing the pattern pieces according to the original measurements; adding a cutting line; and adding a line to show how to size the pieces for someone 8% larger or smaller (they choose which).
  • Review pattern drawings with each student. Make sure each piece is numbered, labeled, and includes three lines (original size, cutting line, second size). If complete, let the student cut pieces out.

Day 6.

  • Have all students finish pattern creation before continuing to the final step of the project.
    • When pattern pieces are cut and ready, give students their materials for their sewing project.
    • Have students start sewing their projects together. Check stitches. Note that this stage of the project will take several class periods.

Final day.

  • Ask students to wear and model their creations.
    • Have students complete the Self-Assessment and Reflection worksheet and submit it.

week 11

Essential Question: What technology will I use to allow students to demonstrate they have met the standards targeted by my rubric? What are the classroom management considerations that I must address?

 

For my lesson we will be using geometers sketchpad, pages, Microsoft word, PowerPoint, and graph paper to design patterns for sewing projects. We will use the smart board to review geometric shapes and we will review Inupiaq clothing with geometric designs.

We will have class rules because once we design our pattern we will be cutting and sewing together skins and furs of animals or fabric. As a class we will go over the proper way to use a razor, scissors, sewing needles and sewing machines. Since my sewing class is an elective and is all high school girls I don’t have any management concerns. They chose to be in my class and want to learn and sew their projects.

Week 10: Geometry and Sewing

How can I differentiate through student product in my classroom?

My group, Math Maniacs, had chosen geometry as our topic. Since I am not teaching math this quarter but I am teaching a sewing class and sewing is full of math I decided to tie the two topics together for my assignment.

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Ms. Top of the World

Look at all the “geometry” in her regalia

My students will investigate geometry in fashion design and clothing construction. They will create pattern for their projects using computer programs and pen and paper, then they will cut out the material and sew the project together. At the end of the class they will do a fashion show Alaska Style.

Here is my Geometry/Sewing Rubric.

  4 (Advanced) 3 (Proficient) 2 (Average) 1(Below Average)
Knowledge and skills specific to project

(Geometry)

 

Defines all key vocabulary, with examples. Recalls all formulas and methods correctly; can explain and apply to other problems. Defines majority of terms, with examples. Majority of formulas and methods applied correctly. Can apply to other problems with some incorrect answers. Definitions and explanations are confusing or incorrect. Some formulas are used correctly. No knowledge evident. There are few correct methods and few correct answers.
Knowledge and skills specific to project

(Sewing)

 

Defines all key vocabulary, with examples. If required, work shows evidence of research on topic or theme. Defines majority of terms, with examples. Shows evidence of research.

 

Definitions and explanations are confusing or incorrect. Shows little evidence of research.

 

No knowledge evident. There is no evidence of research.
Measurement/Calculations

 

Uses correct formulas. Includes all calculations and diagrams used for solution. Answers
 are correct. Majority of formulas are correct. Most work is shown. There are some incorrect answers. Some formulas are used correctly. Some work is shown. There are a number of incorrect answers. There are few correct formulas, little work shown, and a small number of correct answers.
Drawing and Modeling

 

Final work meets criteria and exceeds expectations. All elements are included and correctly labeled. Work shows mastery of technique/technical skill. If required, scale and proportion are represented accurately. Final work meets criteria. Majority of elements are included and labeled. Work shows good command of technique/technical skill.

 

Final work is missing important elements. Technique is weak. Scale and proportion are not represented accurately.

 

Did not do work/contribute. Did not attempt to learn technique.

 

Hand Sewing

 

 

Hand sewing is done correctly. Stitches are correct length and width apart. Knots are invisible. Most of the stitches are the correct length or width apart.

 

Stitches are either too long or too wide apart. The knot is not tight or knotted correctly. The stitches are not the correct stitch. Very noticeable.
Cutting

 

Project was cut 100% to the correct size and edges are smooth and even. Project was cut to the correct size 80%, and most of the edges are smooth with only a very few uneven spots

 

Project was not cut (60% off) to the correct size and edges are uneven and jagged Project was not cut (40% off) to the correct size and edges are uneven and jagged
Creativity

 

Student worked steadily on the design elements to personalize and craft their sewing project(s) 100% of the time. Student worked steadily on the design elements to personalize and craft their sewing project(s) 80% of the time. Student put much thought and consideration in the design and improved it when needed Student put thought into the design and drew a pattern 40% of the time

 

Final Project

 

Meets all criteria. Organization and information exceed expectations. Work reflects excellent understanding of project content. Meets all criteria. Organization and information are presented clearly. Work reflects good understanding of project content. Meets most criteria. Some elements or components are missing.

Pieces are not cut neatly.

 

Did not contribute. Did not submit or is missing major components.

 

ImageFancy Mukluks

Pearltrees

At first I thought, “Great, another site to sign up for!” boy was I wrong. This site is great. I have to admit I was lost at first but once I got the hang of working the site I was hooked.

This is like a virtual concept map of bookmarks. You have a capability of mapping out whatever you want. So I started with our group topic geometry. WOW that is a lot of information to go through. I saved a few. Then I thought I should find the link for this class and some classmates. I was able to find Lori and Donna’s Pearltrees 🙂 My Pearltree is starting to look like a concept map.

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So how can I use Pearltrees to differentiate content in the classroom? Since I teach in an alternative high school and I teach several different subjects I am going to use Pearltrees as a resource for my students. I have already started a pearl for Kiita. In there you will find links for each of the subjects I teach or have an interest in teaching. I can pick links for all the different learning styles I have in my classroom. I can create links to some of the sites I have already bookmarked on my Diigo or on my web browser. I have a few sites that I have my student use for reading and research also games. I can place all of links here in a concept map and let my students direct their learning in way. I would be constant feedback from students about what is missing for the site, likes and dislikes and so on. I am looking forward to using this site in my classroom. Students can get apps for their phones, ipods and ipads also.

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