Geometry and sewing presentation

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week 13

Problem:

You are making fancy mukluk trimming for your new mukluks. The trim is 15 inches long by 3 inches wide. The pattern of the trim is a 3 inch square with a 1×3 inch rectangle on each side. The square has cross in the center of it. The vertical part of the cross is made up of 3- 1 inch squares and the top is a 0.5 by 1 inch rectangle and the bottom is a 1.5 by 1 inch rectangle. The 1×3 inch rectangles are mirror images of each other. They consist of 2 equal right triangles, opposite each other, with height of 1.5 inches and a parallelogram, in the center, with the height of 1.5 inches.
Construct your pattern on a piece of paper.  Please label each piece. If you fold your diagram in half, width wise, you will have a line of symmetry. When your teacher has signed off on your diagram please answer the following questions.
How many times with this pattern repeat itself?
How many pieces are needed for one pattern?
How many:
    squares,
    0.5 by 1 rectangles,
    1.5 by 1 rectangles,
    triangles and
    parallelograms
are needed to complete this mukluk trim?

Student work

 Image

The pattern is a total of 5 inches long (1+3+1=5). The total length of the trim 15 inches.

15/5 = 3. The pattern will repeat itself three times.

There is a total of 3 squares, 6 rectangles, 4 right triangles and 2 parallelograms. The total number of pieces need for one pattern is 15 pieces.

 How many:

         squares,                                         3 x3 = 9

         0.5 by 1 rectangles,                      3×3 = 9

         1.5 by 1 rectangles,                      3 x 3 = 9

         triangles and                                   4 x 3 = 12

         parallelograms                               2 x 3 = 6

are needed to complete this mukluk trim?

    Total you would need nine squares, eighteen rectangles (nine of each size), twelve right triangles and six parallelogram. When you choose your colors for the square, cross, triangles and parallelograms the numbers of each figure with change due to the color needed but the overall total will be the same.

Artifacts

Image

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My students loved the sewing part but did not like having to do MATH during sewing class. We laughed because the lesson came in after we had already started sewing. My girls liked looking at clothing from different families and looking the similarities and differences in style. We made a field trip to the fur shop and priced out some materials and we looked at the photos hanging on the wall of different clothing and designs.

I will do this again but I will start my sewing class with the unit. I want to add more to unit or break it into two units. Our school district is using UbD and this is a unit I will share at one of our meeting. This is a rough unit and needs work.

Week 12: Unit: Geometry in Sewing

Essential Question: How will I demonstrate impact on student learning as a result of my differentiated lesson?

Unit plan: Geometry in sewing

Subject: Sewing, High school mathematics

Introduction: Inhabiting the Arctic Circle for 4000 years, craftswomen of the Inupiat  culture have developed specialized clothing to allow them to survive the glacial winters. While modern textiles are now available, many of the traditional clothes are still used, which stands as a testament to their value and to the expertise of the Inupiat ancestors who created them.

Standards:

G‐MG.1. Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to describe objects (e.g., modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder).*

G‐MG.3. Apply geometric methods to solve design problems (e.g., designing an object or structure to satisfy physical constraints or minimize cost; working with typographic grid systems based on ratios).*

N‐Q.1. Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi‐step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

N‐Q.3.  Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.

Technology Standard
A: A student should be able to operate technology-based tools.
C: A student should be able to use technology to explore ideas, solve problems, and derive meaning.

 

Unit Essential Question: How can we use geometry in our skin sewing?

Unit Enduring Understanding:

  • Geometric shapes
  • Measurements – (prior knowledge)
  • Ratio and proportion – (prior knowledge)
  • Visualization and spatial reasoning
  • Representation and construction of three-dimensional objects

Unit objectives:

  • Students will be able to use visualization and spatial-reasoning skills
  • Students will be able to create patterns or blueprints for three- dimensional objects
  • Students will be able to practice measurement, ratio, and proportion
  • Students will be able to cut out and sew together their projects

Assessments:

  • Pre-assignment on geometry
  • Worksheets
  • Final project

Lesson plans

Day 1.

  • Review Geometric shapes and formulas on the smart board.
  • Pre-assignment – class assignment- place based

Problem: You are making fancy mukluk trimming for your new mukluks. The trim is 15 inches long by 3 inches wide. The pattern of the trim is a 3 inch square with a 1×3 inch rectangle on each side. The square has cross in the center of it. The vertical part of the cross is made up of 3- 1 inch squares and the top is a 0.5 by 1 inch rectangle and the bottom is a 1.5 by 1 inch rectangle. The 1×3 inch rectangles are mirror images of each other. They consist of 2 equal right triangles, opposite each other, with height of 1.5 inches and a parallelogram, in the center, with the height of 1.5 inches.

Construct your pattern on a piece of paper.  Please label each piece. If you fold your diagram in half, width wise, you will have a line of symmetry. When your teacher has signed off on your diagram please answer the following questions.

How many times with this pattern repeat itself?

How many pieces are needed for one pattern?

How many:

squares,

0.5 by 1 rectangles,

1.5 by 1 rectangles,

triangles and

parallelograms

are needed to complete this mukluk trim?

 

Day 2.

  • Provide an overview of the project and review project materials.
  • Solicit a few examples of geometry in clothing students are wearing that day.
  • Explain that students will create a sewing pattern during the project. Show a sample pattern. Ask students what they notice about it. Discuss how a pattern is similar to a house blueprint.
  • Facilitate Before You Go: Figure Figures to help students understand basic body proportion.

Homework

Have students complete Activity 1: Fashion Geometry and prepare pictures or sketches of five examples to share in class.

Day 3.

  • Review the examples students found for Activity 1: Fashion Geometry. Add more of your own to help students see the range.
    • Invite students to suggest why particular geometric patterns, shapes, cuts, or styles were used. Talk about function, features, and style.
    • Preview Activity 2: Clothes Inspection. Assign the first step—finding an article of clothing—for homework.

Homework

Have students find an article of clothing to bring to class.

Day 4.

  • Ask students to examine the article of clothing closely.
  • Distribute tape measures. Explain the Clothes Inspection Worksheet. Indicate whether students should use metric or standard measurements. 
Note: The more complex the clothing, the more challenging this will be! Support students by explaining that they should visualize the main pieces. You may even give them permission to disregard linings and other interior features (for example, for a coat or jacket).
  • Some pieces might include curves or tricky shapes. Ask the class for suggestions on how to get a measurement or fairly accurate estimate of an odd shape. Work on one example together.
  • Have students sketch the shapes of the pieces they think were used to construct their article of clothing, and measure or calculate dimensions. Students might use different approaches. Some may sketch first and then find measurements. Others might want measurements to help them draw the piece. Either approach is fine.
  • Leave 10 minutes for discussion (challenges, observations). Students may only have sketches and measurements for three or four pattern pieces; this is fine. If you think students need more measurement practice, have them finish up for homework. Otherwise, end the activity as is.

Day 5.

  • Review Activity 3: You Be the Designer. Note that this stage of the project will take several class periods and homework assignments.
  • Explain the idea of “ease”—adding 1⁄2 to 1 inch to certain measurements for a looser fit (for example, under the arms).
  • Have students start sketching patterns
  • Sign off on each student’s pattern sketches and measurements. Provide the poster board to students who are ready to move on to drawing. They should not cut pieces yet.
  • Remind students of their three tasks: drawing the pattern pieces according to the original measurements; adding a cutting line; and adding a line to show how to size the pieces for someone 8% larger or smaller (they choose which).
  • Review pattern drawings with each student. Make sure each piece is numbered, labeled, and includes three lines (original size, cutting line, second size). If complete, let the student cut pieces out.

Day 6.

  • Have all students finish pattern creation before continuing to the final step of the project.
    • When pattern pieces are cut and ready, give students their materials for their sewing project.
    • Have students start sewing their projects together. Check stitches. Note that this stage of the project will take several class periods.

Final day.

  • Ask students to wear and model their creations.
    • Have students complete the Self-Assessment and Reflection worksheet and submit it.

week 11

Essential Question: What technology will I use to allow students to demonstrate they have met the standards targeted by my rubric? What are the classroom management considerations that I must address?

 

For my lesson we will be using geometers sketchpad, pages, Microsoft word, PowerPoint, and graph paper to design patterns for sewing projects. We will use the smart board to review geometric shapes and we will review Inupiaq clothing with geometric designs.

We will have class rules because once we design our pattern we will be cutting and sewing together skins and furs of animals or fabric. As a class we will go over the proper way to use a razor, scissors, sewing needles and sewing machines. Since my sewing class is an elective and is all high school girls I don’t have any management concerns. They chose to be in my class and want to learn and sew their projects.